Author: pimpod

1/2/3/4 — #77 — Anna Tivel, Onipa and Yowo Music

Portland artist Anna Tivel creates wide-eyed celestial folk with a confessional edge. She has a wonderful new single out ahead of her album next year and we’ll feature that on this edition of the podcast. As well, William Elliot Whitmore who can seamlessly meld country, blues, folk, and punk together, he does this with aplomb on his new collection of covers, Kilonova. Plus bouncy electronic Afrofuturistic pop from Onipa, the excellent new release from the Yowo Music collective – dedicated to nurturing/encouraging high school aged girls and GNC youth and much more.

Read More

Quiet Space — #72 — Ghost In The Machine

Inspired by the hours spent on travelling on tour and all the isolated landscapes he encountered, Canadian composer Cédric D. Lavoie’s 88 was composed on the piano with bowed and plucked upright basses, some discrete percussion and sound effects.  88 is Cédric D. Lavoie’s first album for Preserved Sound and our featured work on this edition of the Quiet Space. As well the excellent new Yamaneko release on Longform Editions plus Panoptique Electrical, Ben Chatwin and more….

Read More

Quiet Space — #71 — The Slowcraft of James Murray

James Murray is a composer specialising in minimal electronic and electroacoustic music. His recordings have been issued by respected labels worldwide since 2004 and often have strong conceptual themes inviting personal or emotional reflection. Our focus is on his most recent release, Landscape of Lovers. Romantic music can fall into saccharine, soppy, and sickly-sweet traps, but on this release Murray eschews and avoids these dangerous tropes, instead honing in on and finding the essence of love, and of what it means to love.

Read More

Quiet Space — #70 — The Licence To Interpret Dreams

‘The License to Interpret Dreams’, is an intensely focussed dreamworld produced by Antonymes aka Ian Hazeldine. his music emerges from the adjustments and erasures where music expresses nothing but itself, from the relationship between continuity and repetition rather than of contract and interplay. On top of that he is an absolute top bloke. Our feature album for this episode first became available in 2010; it didn’t really sound like it belonged in that year, at the time or now, too ancient seeming, too abstract, too intimate, too damned heart breaking! This edition features some stellar musicians reinterpreting Antonymes dreams. Essential.

Read More